Tag Archives: U.S. Congress

Watching the Watchmen: the bipartisan failure on privacy

The revelations about the NSA spying program have set off a firestorm of partisan finger-pointing (such as this from late last week).  The reality, though, isn’t terribly complex.  Both parties are responsible for selling your privacy down the river with these sorts of programs.  There have been five key votes since 2001 that have been responsible for these programs.

The pattern shows that it doesn’t matter who’s in charge of the Presidency or Congress.  Washington D.C. will vote to take away your privacy, while fighting to make more and more of their actions secret.  The solution to this issue can’t be solved by switching which party is in charge — but rather by a sustained effort to keep pressure on both parties to do the right thing.  We must remain vigilant.

Below is a chart that shows the bipartisan failure on this issue, including votes by Minnesota’s Congressional delegation.  Click on the chart to see a larger version.

bipartisanfailure

Data sourced from THOMAS.gov

10 Charts of the Year – Political Polarization

Today’s Chart of the Year comes to us from Peter Orszag, former Director of the White House Office of Management and Budget and current Vice Chairman of Global Banking at Citigroup.

What does this chart mean?

Our political system is so plagued by polarization, it’s difficult to move any legislation forward. In the late 1960s, significant overlap existed in votes cast by the most conservative Democrats in Congress and those cast by the most liberal Republicans. By the late 1980s, the common ground had diminished. Today, it has virtually disappeared.

Republicans driving the car over a cliff

When he was White House Chief of Staff, Rahm Emanuel famously said “Never allow a crisis to go to waste.”  Republicans in Washington D.C. have certainly learned that rule, and learned it well.  So much so that they are in the process of manufacturing a crisis in order to create the opportunity to get reforms they feel are necessary.

Let’s leave aside for the purposes of this post the sheer absurdity of the notion that after having passed a budget that increases the amount of the national debt over the debt ceiling that Congress then has to re-approve spending to that level.  What Congressional Republicans are doing right now is even more reckless than how Minnesota Republicans handled budget negotiations over the last few months.

President Obama has offered significant spending cuts and pared back his tax increases to the bare minimum.  In fact, what President Obama has offered as part of these negotiations is well to the right of Alan Simpson-Erskine Bowles Bipartisan Deficit Commission, the Senate  “Gang of Six”,  and the Alice Rivlin-Pete Domenici Deficit Commission.

President Obama has offered a plan that is almost 4:1 spending cuts to revenue increases.  The revenue increases consist of eliminating loopholes, subsidies, and deductions — many of which Republicans have supported in the past.  The tax code should not be used to pick winners and losers, but rather to ensure a level playing field and to provide the necessary resources for government to perform its functions.  They would be accompanied by a lowering of rates overall to make the changes generate far less revenue than they otherwise would.  This used to be a core Republican value.

Normal people would jump at such a deal — a chance for real entitlement reform ($650 billion in savings over the next 10 years), real cuts in discretionary spending ($1 trillion over the next 10 years, taking such spending back to pre-WWII levels), and rational tax reform that generates about 20% of the overall solution.

But today’s Republicans aren’t normal.  They are devoted to “no new tax” ideology at any cost.  They are willing to drive the car off the cliff as opposed to forcing their wealthy and corporate patrons — who have benefitted the most over the past decade while the labor market and median incomes for the rest of us have stagnated — to chip in just a little bit more.

If Congressional Republicans can’t come to an agreement on the debt ceiling and the country goes into default, they will effectively raise the taxes of every American through increased interest rates.  Our stock market will feel the impact of lost confidence of investors.  There could even be a run on the banks.  This is not a risk we should even be considering, but Republicans are still — even at this late date — still holding out for complete capitulation from the President.

We shouldn’t also fail to point the rank hypocrisy of many of the Congressional Republicans at the heart of this crisis today.  During the Bush Administration, these same leaders voted seven times to raise the debt ceiling — from $5.95 trillion to $11.315 trillion.  They also voted for policies that destroyed our financial future.  As the New York Times pointed out over the weekend, if you take out the impacts of the recession and only look at policy changes, what happened in the Bush Administration caused far more damage than anything that has happened under President Obama (even extending out the impacts of the Obama policy changes to 2017).  Note that the cost of the Bush tax cuts alone is more than all of the policy changes under President Obama combined.

It’s time to stop the false equivalency.  There is a very real difference between Democrats and Republicans — both in Washington D.C. and in St. Paul.  Democrats aren’t willing to put their partisan goals ahead of the well-being of the American people.  Republicans are seemingly content to “take hostages” — including the American economy — to fulfill their ideological goals.

Compromise isn’t a dirty word.  Compromise isn’t weakness.  Compromise is necessary in a divided government, and it’s time Republicans started getting back to doing the serious work of the people instead of being led around by their special interest groups.

It’s our fault, too

Wonder why we get such ridiculous policies and nonsense from our politicians? In part, it’s because we can’t face up to the hard choices.

A recent Pew survey showed that although most Americans would prefer spending cuts to tax increases to balance the budget, there’s practically no area of the budget that we favor cutting.

Education: +51 (62% favor increased spending versus 11% favor cutting spending)
Veterans benefits: +45
Medicare: +28
Crime prevention: +21
Health care (excluding Medicare): +17
Energy: +13
Scientific research +13
Environment: +10
Anti-terrorism: +10
Agriculture: +9
Defense: +1
Unemployment benefits: -1
Foreign aid: -24

The only area of the budget that Americans can agree (outside of the margin of error) on cutting is foreign aid, which represents 1% of the federal budget.

But it gets better (or worse).

When asked about how states should balance their budgets, here was the support for different provisions:

Cut government pensions: 0 (47% favor, 47% oppose)
Raise business taxes: -14
Cut higher education: -35
Cut transportation: -36
Increase sales taxes: -37
Increase income taxes: -40
Cut health care: -55
Cut K-12 education: -61

That’s right. Even though nearly every state in the union faces significant deficits, there isn’t a single provision to address the issue that has popular support.

We can’t expect our politicians to get the house in order if we aren’t willing to be honest about the choices we have to make.


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